Lawmakers in Connecticut continue their debate over legal pot and drugged driving.

According to the Hartford Courant, CT lawmakers are reaching out to emergency service personnel and police departments about how to measure the level of marijuana accurately in an individual who is behind the wheel.

State Rep. Gail Lavielle of Wilton told the Courant that using recreational marijuana in a private setting where an individual is not placing anyone at risk is one thing, but if that individual is behind the wheel, it's a totally different ballgame.

Are police officers able to tell if someone is driving stoned? They sure can. Officers have been trained to detect the signs of impairment. In 2016, a study was conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, where it was found that the finger-to-nose test was the best barometer to tell if someone was under the influence of pot. Check out this video to find out how Canada tests for marijuana.

Have you ever wondered how much revenue the legalization of marijuana would generate in Connecticut? Senate President Pro Tem, Martin Looney who's in favor of legalization, told the Courant, "It would be a significant new revenue source for the state of Connecticut." Paul Kirchberg, executive director of Connecticut NORML, thinks that legalizing marijuana could easily add $180 million per year to the state's coffers.