This weekend's full Moon is the Strawberry moon, and it's a unique one in that the Moon is partially in the shadow of the Earth, creating a partial eclipse.

According to NASA, the Moon will appear full from early Thursday morning into Sunday morning, but it officially becomes full at 3:12 PM Friday afternoon (June 5.)  NASA says,

The Moon will be close enough to opposite the Sun that it will pass through part of the partial shadow of the Earth, called a partial penumbral eclipse of the Moon. During this eclipse the Moon will not be in the sky for most of the Americas.

The Strawberry Moon name comes from the Algonquin tribe to describe this seasonal full moon. The term is derived from the short strawberry harvesting season in the Northeast. Other names for this Moon include the Mead Moon or the Honey Moon. This is an old European name for the Moon, alluding to the time when honey is ripe and ready to be harvested. Mead is a drink made from fermented honey (side note, it's quietly becoming popular as an alternative to beer, is liquid candy with a kick, and will knock you on your butt.)  The tradition of a "honeymoon" after marriage may also be derived from this Moon, due to the popularity of June weddings.

NASA says that "as usual, the wearing of suitably celebratory celestial attire is encouraged in honor of the full Moon." So throw something celestial on, grab a glass of mead, and head outside between the thundershowers this warm weekend for a glimpse of the Strawberry Moon.

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